In this new Next Page column, David Flesner, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, explains why he is a big fan of author Dan Brown, which book inspired him as a child to pursue mathematics, why he adopted “Fyodor” as a class name in high school, and much more.

**********

I know you are a fan of Dan Brown and have read all his books. What about Brown’s writing appeals to you? Characters? Plot? Why? Does the appeal have anything do with your being a mathematician?

There are two main characteristics of Dan Brown’s books that appeal to me. First, as a mathematician I am intrigued by his use of symbology. There is a nice, tight logic and puzzle nature throughout his works. His use of symbols is marvelous. There is a wonderful little book Dictionary of Symbols by Carl G.

In this new Next Page column, Jocelyn Swigger, Associate Professor of Music, shares with us which authors and books are her “comfort foods,” how she has introduced meditation to her daily practice as a musician, and one of the few things she likes about Twitter.

In this new Next Page column, Jan Powers, Professor Emerita of Interdisciplinary Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies shares her thoughts on what makes a great novel and where she believes the best literature in the English-speaking world comes from.

In this new Next Page column, Erin Duran, LGBTQA Advisor and Residential Life Coordinator, shares with us the name of the author he appreciates even more now that he knows said author is from his home state of Texas, which title caught his attention as a sixth grader (and the hit song played on repeat while reading!), and which authors he frequently recommends to students for their challenging (in a good way) discussion of LGBTQA topics.

In this latest edition of Next Page, Dan Gilbert, the David M. LeVan Professor of Ethics and Management, shares with us books that inspired his teaching career, his love of baseball (1,100+ games and counting!), and the activities he’s looking forward to as he shakes off the Gettysburg winter and settles into retirement in sunny Southern California.
1

In this Next Page contribution, Ed Riggs ’77 talks about his adventures on the Appalachian Trail last summer, what he read to prepare for the trip, how he got his trail name, favorite authors to read when he's off the trail, and more.

**********

You recently hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine. What did you read in advance to prepare for this adventure?

I started hiking the Appalachian Trail on March 18 in Georgia with the intent of walking to Maine.

In the current issue of Next Page, Mauricio Novoa, Class of 2014 and winner of the Silent Leader Award, tells us which authors‘ discourse on race has inspired him and what poet Marianne Moore has taught him about writing.

**********

Do you have a favorite book or literary character or from your childhood?

I don’t know if I have any clear-cut favorites, but I remember going to Target a few months back and being really excited to see Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein on the shelves.
1

In this issue of Next Page, Professor of Physics Larry Marschall tells us about the many influential authors (and a musician!) who inspired everything from his career path, to his political involvement and how he raised his children.

**********

What are you reading now (or have read recently) that you would recommend and why?

I usually have two books going on my night table at any one time, one non-fiction and one novel.

In this new Next Page offering, Associate Professsor of Religious Studies Megan Adamson Sijapati divulges her old school methods of keeping track of what to read next, as well as which book recently replaced Steinbeck's East of Eden as her go-to book for giving as a gift.

**********

What are you reading now (or have read recently) that you would recommend? Why?

Tillie Olsen's Tell Me a Riddle, which is a collection of four short stories. I recommend it because Olsen's writing is spellbinding.

In the latest edition of Next Page, Franklin Professor of the Liberal Arts and Professor of History Michael Birkner shares why he connects with Richard Russo’s work and which amazing book he has given away as a gift in recent years (hint: it’s not an Eisenhower book!).

**********

What are you reading now (or have read recently) that you would recommend and why?

I just finished David Eisenhower’s breezy and insightful Going Home to Glory, an account of his grandfather Dwight D.
Loading